Casa Tepozantitla

Studio: Fabian Medina Arquitecto
Authors: Fabian Medina Ramos
Location: Mexico City, Mexico
Video: Erwin Neumayer, Natalia Neumaier, Sigfrido Barjau

The house was built in a 118 square meter surface with a 7 meter front. The owner is a renown women rights advocate who requires quiet private spaces to be able to rest and recover from her work. Ample generous spaces were created by linking covered interior spaces with exterior spaces. These spaces are three courtyards: The garage/entry connected to the L shaped central patio, and the rear courtyard.
The project has two levels and a roof terrace. On the ground floor, the entry and garage, give way to a studio used for meetings and somatic education sessions. The studio has its own restroom and can be kept independent from the rest of the house or connected to the upper levels through a set of stairs designed to not disturb the other spaces and activities. The entrance and garage are connected to the central patio, but they can be separated by a safety sliding gate. The main interior space serves as dining, living and kitchen spaces. In the back of the space, the rear courtyard works as a separation with the neighboring church, giving a feeling of openness in the back of the house, allowing yet, privacy at each space. A stair leads to the upper floor where the master bedroom and bathroom are. Following the same stair, on the top of the house, the roof terrace has the laundry and sauna. The terrace has plants that incorporate with the view to the neighboring church and atrium.


The decision to submit this home in the Personal Spaces category is due to the daily use of the house by the owner, combining the functions of being her private residence and workplace, having an active professional activity and meetings with peer advocates and victims of human rights violations.
The location was selected after a thorough search all around Mexico City by architect and client -that happen to be father and daughter, with the goal in mind of having an easy to access, quiet with a comfortable scale and surrounding real community life, in contrast to heavy populated urban areas with high rise apartment buildings.
The piece of land itself is traditionally known as “Tepozantitla”, located in the prehispanic enclave of Axotla, south of Mexico City. It is part of the historic landmark of Coyoacan, even though part of the large urban area, still rich in live costumes and small town daily life, manifested mostly by the San Sebastián Martir neighboring church, erected in the XVI century.
The project harmonizes with the tree covered church atrium and the plant covered roof terrace. The bedroom and living room keeps a relationship with the church atrium with a view to it, yet allowing privacy to the interior.
The house joins efforts with the city inhabitants in maintaining the livable scale of their surroundings by creating a welcoming quiet space within the hectic rhythm of Mexico City.